The Library at St. Cloud State University

BIOL 494: Pathophysiology

Identifying Background Information
SAGE Reference Online Restricted Resource Some full text availabledatabase eref ebook
Provides access to 90 full-text specialized encyclopedias that offer excellent background information on a topic.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
"...the CDC provides a system of health surveillance to monitor and prevent disease outbreaks (including bioterrorism), implement disease prevention strategies, and maintain national health statistics."

NORD Rare Disease Database
NORD's Rare Disease Database provides brief introductions for patients and their families to more than 1,200 rare diseases. Individuals can access two full reports in a 24-hour period.
 
Finding Journal Articles
Scopus (Science) Restricted Resource findit database
Science, technology, engineering, and medical literature from 15,000 scholarly journals.  Scopus indexes Medline, a very important database for this topic. If you have a disease they can search it by using something like E. coli and epidemiology, etiology, prognosis, etc., and depending on the disease narrowing to human, male, female, or age, etc. 

OMIM - On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man Unrestricted Resource Resource contains imagesdatabase
"OMIM is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes that is freely available and updated daily"

JoVE Restricted Resource Resource contains videodatabase
Provides access to thousands of video "articles" from top research institutions around the world, each demonstrating an experimental technique or procedure. Topics covered include Biology, Chemistry, Applied Physics, Bioengineering, Environment, and Science Education.
Citing Sources
Academic writing involves finding, evaluating, and using information resources.  When you use research, quotes, ideas, or data you have found in books, articles, webpages, etc. you need to cite the source of your information. Why do you need to cite your sources?
  • Effectively integrating source material from the experts with your own ideas and accurately referencing that source material can lend support to the argument in your paper and credibility to your reputation as a maturing professional in your field
  • Providing complete references enables readers who are interested in your topic to find out more about your research
  • Just as you expect to receive credit for your work, other authors expect and deserve credit for theirs  (from LEO: Literacy Education Online)

If you do not cite your sources you are being academically dishonest and guilty of plagiarism, a violation of SCSU's Student Code of Conduct:
"Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to: cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation of student status, and resume, transcript or diploma falsification. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quotation, the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment; unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in selling or otherwise providing term papers or other academic materials; and commercialization, sale or distribution of class notes without the instructors’ permission."
Plagiarism can result in a failing grade for the assignment or the class as well as other disciplinary actions.
Subject Specialist
Picture: Michael Gorman

Michael Gorman
Associate Professor, Research Librarian
MC 140F
(320) 308-2028
msgorman@stcloudstate.edu

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